Syllabus

Anthropological Theories

1171-FIU01-ANT-3034-SECRVC-32469

    General Information

    Professor Information

    Professor Photo
    Dennis Wiedman, Ph.D. Anthropologist
    (305) 348-2262
    SIPA 327 (MMC)
    By Appointment
    Please use Blackboard Messages

    Course Description and Purpose

    Theories structure a discipline’s inquiry and define what is important. This course investigates anthropological ways of knowing, understanding, and explaining humankind. A special focus is on how theories and methods are used by anthropologists to address contemporary issues.

    Through a comparative analysis of the similarities and differences among major anthropological theories and theorists, we discuss how these have changed or remained consistent over time adapting to the social, political, and economic trends in science, society, and the world.  By each student focusing on a contemporary theory we explore the history of ideas and theorists that guide anthropological inquiry, applications and public discourse today.  On successful completion of the course students should be able to articulate a theoretical perspective they can use to understand contemporary issues and problems.

    Course Objectives

    Students will be able to:

    1. Understand the interpretive and explanatory role of theory for the production of knowledge.
    2. Critique the assumptions, questions and preferred methods for major anthropological theories.
    3. Apply a theoretical perspective to address a contemporary issue or problem.
    4. Articulate:
      • a theoretical explanation for a research question or applied problem.
      • the major theorists credited for the development of the theory
      • how theory is used by contemporary anthropologists.

    Major and Curriculum Objectives Targeted

    For those who are pursuing the anthropology track for the BA in Anthropology/Sociology, this is a required course.

    Teaching Methodology

    For this course, all of the materials and discussions will be conducted online using Blackboard Learn. Course content is based on textbook readings, Professor presentations, PowerPoint presentations, discussion forums, web content, videos, and FlU electronic library sources. In addition to the Professor’s presentations, this course uses web content, primarily Internet video, to immerse the student in the primary concepts presented in the textbook and weekly readings. Videos range from a few minutes to an hour in length.

    Where traditional on-campus courses are three hours per week, this online course contains about two-three hours of web content. Weekly Professor meetings take students through the specific learning objectives and discussion forums enable students to critically evaluate and communicate the information. Students become Theory Specialists of a major anthropological theory and in weekly discussions and debates distinguish between the major theories. Two individual essays and a Contemporary Theory PowerPoint Presentation promote critical inquiry and an understanding of how anthropology can be used to solve human problems. Three quizzes and the final exam evaluate the student's overall comprehension.

    Important Information

    Technical Requirements & Skills

    One of the greatest barriers to taking an online course is a lack of basic computer literacy. By computer literacy we mean being able to manage and organize computer files efficiently, and learning to use your computer's operating system and software quickly and easily. Keep in mind that this is not a computer literacy course; but students enrolled in online courses are expected to have moderate proficiency using a computer. Please go to the "What's Required" webpage to find out more information on this subject.

    Technical course requirements include the following:

    • A reliable Internet connection
    • Regular access to a laptop or desktop computer with an updated operating system and web browser
    • Anti-virus software
    • Adobe Acrobat Reader (Download Here)
    • Microsoft PowerPoint 
    • Microsoft Word or similar word processor
    • Required Browser Check for Blackboard Learn (our online learning platform)

    This course utilizes the following tools:

    Please visit our Technical Requirements webpage for additional information.

    If you encounter any technical problems while submitting an assignment or assessment, it is your responsibility to contact FIU Online Support Services immediately and take note of your case number for future reference. The phone number is 305-348-3630. 

    Accessibility And Accommodation

    Please visit our ADA Compliance webpage for information about accessibility involving the tools used in this course.

    Please visit Blackboard's Commitment Accessibility webpage for more information. 

    For additional assistance please contact FIU's Disability Resource Center.

    Policies

    Please review FIU's Policies webpage. The policies webpage contains essential information regarding guidelines relevant to all courses at FIU, as well as additional information about acceptable netiquette for online courses.

    Timeliness. Exercises and essays are due on the due date. Late Essays receive a letter grade reduction for each week it is late. The last dates to submit extra credits and late assignments are posted in the course schedule.

    Academic Misconduct Statement

    Florida International University is a community dedicated to generating and imparting knowledge through excellent teaching and research, the rigorous and respectful exchange of ideas and community service. All students should respect the right of others to have an equitable opportunity to learn and honestly to demonstrate the quality of their learning. Therefore, all students are expected to adhere to a standard of academic conduct, which demonstrates respect for themselves, their fellow students, and the educational mission of the University. All students are deemed by the University to understand that if they are found responsible for academic misconduct, they will be subject to the Academic Misconduct procedures and sanctions, as outlined in the Student Handbook.

    Academic Misconduct includes: Cheating – The unauthorized use of books, notes, aids, electronic sources; or assistance from another person with respect to examinations, course assignments, field service reports, class recitations; or the unauthorized possession of examination papers or course materials, whether originally authorized or not. Plagiarism – The use and appropriation of another’s work without any indication of the source and the representation of such work as the student’s own. Any student who fails to give credit for ideas, expressions or materials taken from another source, including internet sources, is responsible for plagiarism.

    All sources must be identified with in-text citations and in a "References Cited" section using the style of American Anthropologist. Essays are submitted to Blackboard's Turnitin feature for an assessment of originality. Students who violate these principles could receive a grade of "F" for the course. The instructor has the authority to consider academic misconduct charges that carry considerable penalties.

    Learn more about the academic integrity policies and procedures as well as student resources that can help you prepare for a successful semester.

    You must agree to the Ethics Statement in the course content in order to proceed with the course. 

    Course Prerequisites

    There are no prerequisites for this course.

    Proctored Exam Policy

    This online section does not require an on-campus visit or proctored exam.

    Textbook

    Textbook Image
    A History of Anthropological Theory (Required)
    Paul A. Erickson, Liam Donat Murphy
    University of Toronto Press, 4th Edition, 2013
    ISBN-10: 9781442606593
    ISBN-13: 1442606592
    Book Info. You may purchase your textbook online at the FIU Bookstore.
    Textbook Image
    Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological Theories and Theorists (Required)
    Jerry D. Moore
    Altamira Press, 4th Edition, 2012
    ISBN-10: 0759122180
    ISBN-13: 9780759122185
    Book Info. You may purchase your textbook online at the FIU Bookstore.

    Original Anthropology Theorist Readings: Selected publications written by the original theorists are required readings as noted in the schedule below and in Blackboard. All are available free of charge through the FIU Library – electronic journals, or as a pdf in Blackboard.

    Expectations of this Course

    This is an online course, which means most (if not all) of the course work will be conducted online. Expectations for performance in an online course are the same for a traditional course. In fact, online courses require a degree of self-motivation, self-discipline, and technology skills which can make these courses more demanding for some students.

    As a student in this course, you are expected to:

    • Review the "Getting Started" information located in the course content
    • Introduce yourself to the class during the first week in the appropriate discussion forum
    • Take the Practice Quiz to ensure that your computer is compatible with Blackboard Learn
    • Become a Theory Specialist in one major anthropological theory (covered in Teaching Methodology)
    • Follow the course schedule and submit assignments by the corresponding deadlines
    • Log in to the course at least 3 times per week
    • Interact with students in assigned groups in Blackboard
    • Produce two essays and a Career Profile presentation (covered in Teaching methodology/assignments)
    • Take quizzes and a final examination (covered in Teaching methodology/assignments)
    • Engage in discussion/debates by posting positions and responses 
    • Respond to discussion posts within 2 days
    • Respond to Blackboard Messages within 2 days

    I, the instructor, will:

    • Log in to the course 7 times per week
    • Respond to discussion posts within 3 days
    • Respond to Blackboard Messages within 3 days
    • Grade assignments within 7 days of the assignment deadline

    Course Detail

    Course Communication

    Below is a summary of the primary methods to communicate in the class within Blackboard.

    Announcements. Used when I need to communicate something to the whole class. It is important to read announcements as soon as they are posted. 

    Messages. Blackboard messages is the best method to communicate with me privately. Do not use regular email. Only students enrolled in the course, the instructors, and Blackboard technical support can view messages and discussions. Users must log on to the Blackboard system to send/receive/read messages. There are no notifications in Blackboard to inform users when a new message has been received; therefore it is recommended that you check your messages routinely to ensure up-to-date communication.

    Discussion Forums. Be sure to regularly check the Course Issues and Open Discussion forums in the Discussion Board.  

    • In the Course Issues forum, you and the instructor can post any course issues, such as clarification of instructions, problems, issues, or interesting ways to use Blackboard. Students, please help one another by answering questions or issues when they are posted.

    • In the Open Discussion forum, you and the instructor can post interesting ideas you may have related to the course. This is an open discussion facilitating back and forth dialog. Something in the news related to the course? Find an interesting web site? How about your insights connecting things learned in the course, or new ways to implement anthropological concepts. Is there a campus/community event, TV program, or special place to see? This Forum is to liven up the course and facilitate interactions. (This forum is not for course points or a grade).  

    Visit our Writing Resources webpage for more information on professional writing and technical communication skills.

    Professor Meetings Using Adobe Connect

    Adobe Connect is an online meeting room where you can interact with your professor and fellow students by sharing screens, sharing files, chatting, broadcasting live audio, and taking part in other interactive online activities. 

    Professor meetings will take place at scheduled times only during the first two weeks:

    • The first will be the afternoon of Wednesday, January 11 from 4 pm - 5 pm, ET
    • The second meeting will be on Wednesday, January 18 from 4 pm - 5 pm, ET.

    Thereafter, meetings can be scheduled when there is student interest. Attendance is not required. Individual students can email the professor or teaching assistant at any time to make an appointment to talk about their concerns. 

    Requirements for using Adobe Connect:

    • Disable any window pop-up blocker.
    • Adobe Flash Player is required to successfully run your Adobe Connect meeting. You can test your computer to make sure your computer and network connections are properly configured to provide you with the best possible Adobe Connect meeting experience.
    • Use of a combination headset and microphone with USB connection is recommended to ensure quality sound and reduce technical difficulties.

    Reference Adobe Connect (Tutorials & Help) to learn about the tool, how to access your meeting rooms and recordings.

    Course Requirements

    All course requirements must be completed in order to earn a passing grade. Each course requirement earns points as noted in the grade calculation section. Final grades are non-negotiable; letter grades are assigned based on the points earned.


    Weekly Lessons

    These are learning modules containing PowerPoint presentations, web content, and videos.


    Assessments (28%)

    The quizzes and the final exam are primarily multiple choice, true/false, and matching-type questions. Make-up quizzes and final exam will be given only to those students who present a written document from a physician, the FIU Clinic or comparable legitimate source. Make-ups may be different than the original format.

    In order to mitigate any issues with your computer and online assessments, it is very important that you take the "Practice Quiz" from each computer you will be using to take your graded quizzes and exams. It is your responsibility to make sure your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements.

    Assessments in this course are not compatible with mobile devices and should not be taken through a mobile phone or a tablet. If you need further assistance please contact FIU Online Support Services.

    Quizzes (18%)

    Quizzes cover material from the weekly readings, presentations, web materials and exercises. Quizzes will have 30-35 questions. They will be available from Friday at 6:00 AM, to Saturday at 11:59 PM, ET. You will have 45 minutes to complete each quiz. Scores will be posted within a week.

    Final Exam (10%)

    The final exam is cumulative of the entire course including all readings, presentations, web materials and exercises. Reserve two hours for this exam which will be available from the morning of Friday, April 21 to Sunday, April 23 at 11:59 PM, ET.


    Exercises (5%)

    Points are earned for the following 5 learning activities:

    1. Self Introduction in the Discussion Board
    2. Syllabus Quiz
    3. Ethics Statement
    4. Course Feedback Survey
    5. Selection of one contemporary theory article


    Theory Specialist Position Statement (15%)

    Students will be assigned to groups of 4-6 members, each group representing an anthropological theory.

    During the first half of the semester, students in each group are to become experts in their assigned theory by reading the course texts, original theorist writings, course lectures, and additional sources. Each group has their own Group Discussion Board to dialog with one another as they become familiar with the theory. 

    During the second half of the semester, groups will serve as advocates, proponents, and spokespersons for their assigned theory. Each week is devoted to a debate on one of the major anthropological theories. Each student Theory Specialist for that week contributes one thoughtful "Theory Specialist Position Statement" on an aspect of the major theory and the required original theorist publication. In preparation for the debate, each student Theory Specialist focuses on a distinct aspect of the theory in consultation with theory group members to ensure that each student’s Position Statement is unique. The week of the debate, students from the other theory groups then post responses to at least one of the Position Statements from the perspective of their theory specialty. See section below for posting guidelines. 


    Weekly Discussions: Commentary and Responses (20%)

    Semester First Half

    Each week, starting in Week 2, I will post a discussion prompt in the Class Discussion Board based on the topic covered the previous week. You are expected to contribute at least 1 thoughtful commentary and at least 2 responses to other students' commentaries. Commentaries reflect on the weekly topics/questions drawn from your understanding of the course materials, your personal experiences and what you found interesting or surprising. Responses to another student's posting might provide an alternative perspective, a clarification, additional information, etc.

    • Discussion topics will be posted by Tuesday at 6:00 am, ET
    • Post at least one commentary of 150-200 words by Wednesday at 11:59 PM, ET.
    • Post at least 2 responses of 100-150 words each by Sunday at 11:59 PM, ET.
    • Discussion forum closes and does not accept items after the due date.

    Semester Second Half

    Anthropological theory debates begin in Week 8. Each student Theory Specialist for that week's theory contributes one thoughtful "Theory Specialist Position Statement" on an aspect of the major theory and the required original theorist publication. In preparation for the debate, each student focuses on a distinct aspect of the theory in consultation with theory group members to ensure that each student’s Position Statement is unique (see Theory Specialist Position Statement section above). 

    • The week prior to the theory's scheduled debate, group members dialog with one another and with the instructor to refine each group member's unique Theory Specialist Position Statement (150-200 words) in the Group Discussion Board. Each group member must submit their finalized theory position statement to the Group File Exchange and the corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday at 11:59 pm, ET. 

    • The Position Statements become available in the Weekly Discussion Board by the next Tuesday at 6:00 am, ET and close by Sunday at 11:59 PM, ET. 

      • The rest of the class then debates that week's theory from their respective theory specialist positions. Each student must debate at least one theory specialist position statement for that week. Theory Specialists and respondents dialog back and forth highlighting the distinctions between their major theories. 

      • Responses to another student's posting might provide an alternative perspective, a clarification, additional information derived from their theoretical perspective. 

      • Before posting, students should read prior posts by other students to ensure that they are adding something new to the discussion. Everyone must post at least 2 responses. 

      • The week's theory specialists are expected to respond to comments promptly throughout the week. Multiple shorter dialogs back and forth on critical issues are highly desirable and receive the highest scores.

    These discussions must NOT be used for the transmission of personal messages from a student to another, or from a student to the professor. For personal communications, use Blackboard Messages.

    Grading. Discussion entries will be evaluated for thoughtfulness and evidence that you are engaging the course materials. Posts must demonstrate that you read and viewed the required materials by citing the source page, PowerPoint lecture, video title, or any other source used. To receive any points, you must directly refer to course materials, readings, presentations or videos. Additional information from other sources is highly valued.  A scoring rubric provides details on how weekly discussions are assessed and scored. See Discussions and Debates Instructions in the course menu for more detailed information. 

    Discussion forums are graded within one week after the deadline.
     

    Contemporary Theory Essays (25%)

    First Contemporary Theory Essay (10%)

    In this essay, you will demonstrate your knowledge of anthropological theory and skills in critical analysis and writing. You are to discuss one research article detailing how anthropological theories are used by the Anthropologist(s) to address a human problem.

    1. Select one research article published in the past seven years from an anthropology journal listed in Course Materials section on the course menu. The article must be related to the theory in which you are specializing. 
    2. Write an essay (2 pages minimum, excluding references section) on how the authors use anthropology theory and methods to address the research problem or issue. 

    You must submit a file copy of your selected article with your written markups along with your essay. Detailed instructions with key concepts, outline and required bolded headers are located in the Course Materials section on the course menu.

    Second Contemporary Theory Essay (15%)

    Discuss a second research article using the same criteria, key concepts and outline as in the first essay. Then compare the first and second articles on how they apply the same anthropological theories to address a human problem. What methods do anthropologists use to support this theory? How does this contemporary theory relate to the major heuristic theories and leading historical theorists? Your completed essay should have three parts: 

    1. Discuss the first article
    2. Discuss the second article
    3. Compares the two articles

    Each part should be 2 pages for a total of 6 pages, not including the “References Cited” section. You must submit a copy of the second article with your markups along with the essay. 

    Detailed instructions with key concepts, outline and required bolded headers are located in the Course Materials section on the course menu.

    Designated out-of-class exercises and course papers must be submitted in Blackboard through Turnitin. This University sponsored service improves student writing by preventing plagiarism and provides rich feedback. Review the detailed Turnitin Instructions on how to submit your assignments and how to review the Grademark comments (feedback) from your professor.


    Contemporary Theory Presentation (7%)

    A PowerPoint presentation reports on the two articles in your essays (see above) with additional information about the theory from other books and articles.

    • What are the commonalities in theoretical concepts and explanatory approaches of anthropologists who use this theory?
    • What methods do anthropologists use to support this theory?
    • How does this contemporary theory relate to the major heuristic theories and leading historical theorists.

    The presentation should be of a length that is presentable in ten minutes, and should be about ten slides.  I will select PowerPoint presentations representing the array of anthropology theories for review and comment by all the students.

    Library Exercises

    These inform you of course essay assignments and provide ways to learn more about anthropology. Exercises contained in a web page designed for this course by Internet Librarian Sarah Hamill guide students through the use of the FlU library to locate anthropology books, journals, databases and AA citation style. See web page at ANT3034 Library Guide

    • Library Home: Introduces the web page purpose, layout and exercise tabs.
    • Library Lesson 1: Become familiar with the Library: Learn to use the FlU electronic library to locate and access books and journals.
    • Library Lesson 2: Database Comparison: Learn to use the FlU electronic library to locate and access Anthropology publications using the databases AnthroSource and Anthropology Plus.
    • Library Lesson 3: Anthropology Journals: Shows how to locate anthropology journals for this course.

    Optional Ways to Get a Better Grade (Extra Credit)

    Instructions for the variety of ways to earn extra credit are in Blackboard:Course Materials:Optional Extra Credit Opportunities.


    Optional Anthropologist Presentation 

    You can produce a PowerPoint presentation with a voiceover recording focusing on the career of a single contemporary anthropologist highlighting how they contributed to the further development of anthropological theories. A contemporary theorist is a Ph.D. Anthropologist who has published in the past ten years. The presentation should be of a length that is presentable in ten minutes, and should be about ten slides. Post the presentation in the course Assignment Dropbox. Be sure to reduce the pixel size of the graphic images so that the file is not too large to submit via Blackboard. Earn up to three extra points. 


    Optional PowerPoint Presentation to the Class

    I will preview the submitted "Optional Anthropologist Presentations," and select those to be reviewed and commented online by everyone in the class. The selected Optional Presentations can earn up to 5 additional points.


    Optional Internet Videos

    Recommend Internet videos that facilitate student understanding of anthropological theory. Justify your selection with a narrative why it is of value for students to view, how it specifically contributes to a better understanding of anthropological theory.  Identify the part of the course where this could be used to facilitate student learning. What makes this interesting? Include the web address, title of the video and viewing minutes.  Post in Blackboard Class Discussion Board Optional Video where students view and comment on the video. Recommendations are accepted anytime during the semester up to deadline for extra credits noted in the syllabus course schedule. Earn up to 5 extra points for all your recommendations.

    Other Notes


    Format and Line Spacing. Use MS Word, using 1 inch top, bottom, and side margins.  Use Times Roman 12 point font.  Do not use separate cover page. The single line spaced “References Cited” section immediately follows the text, do not begin on the next page.  Do not use footnotes. Place topic of paper, student name, and date single-spaced on top of first page.  Name should appear on the top right of each page. Bottom center page numbers. For each of the assignments follow the instructions in Blackboard: Course Materials which provides further specifications on the outline to follow, the section headers, page lengths and line spacing.

    American Anthropologist Style. All assignments, both electronic, MUST use the source citation format and style of the American Anthropologist. Style guidelines are available in Blackboard: Course Materials, “Writing Papers in the Style of the American Anthropologist.”

    Timeliness. Exercises and essays are due on the due date. Late Essays receive a letter grade reduction for each week it is late. The last dates to submit extra credits and late assignments are posted in the course schedule.

    Turnitin.com. Designated out-of-class exercises and course papers must be submitted through Blackboard:Submissions using Turnitin.com.  This University sponsored service improves student writing by preventing plagiarism and provides rich feedback. Review the detailed Turnitin Instructions on how to submit your assignments and how to review the Grademark comments (feedback) from your professor.

    Grading

    Course Requirements Number of Items Points for Each Total Points Available
    Quizzes 3 6 18
    Final Exam 1 10 10
    Theory Specialist Position Statement 1 15 15
    Weekly Discussion-Commentary and Responses 10 2 20
    First Essay 1 10 10
    Second Essay 1 15 15
    Contemporary Theory Presentation 1 7 7
    Exercises 5 1 5
    Total:     100
    OPTIONAL (EXTRA CREDIT)     EARN POINTS UP TO:
    Individual PowerPoint     3
    Presentation to Class     5
    Internet Videos     5
    Grand Total Points:     113
    Letter Range (%) Letter Range (%) Letter Range (%)
    A 95 - 100 B 83 - 86 C 70 - 76
    A- 90 - 94 B- 80 - 82 D 60 - 69
    B+ 87 - 89 C+ 77 - 79 F 0 - 59

    Course Calendar

    Module Weekly Schedule

    You are responsible for reviewing all weekly course content in Blackboard during their scheduled dates. The below is a quick reference guide to when lessons, activities, quizzes, exercises and meetings are scheduled or due. Assigned readings are to be completed by Week indicated. Theory debates follow the instructor’s online presentation.

    You are expected to log into the course at least 3 times per week to review weekly content. Be sure to check the Course Issues and Open Discussion forums in the Discussion Board. 

    All activities are due at 11:59 pm, ET on their respective due dates, except for live professor meetings scheduled. 

    Week 1: Jan. 9 - Jan. 15

    Introductions and Course Overview

    Presentation

    • Anthropological Theories Introduction

    Activities

    • Professor Meeting 1: via Adobe Connect; Wednesday, Jan. 11 from 4 pm to 5 pm, ET
    • Exercise 2: Syllabus Quiz - available Friday, Jan. 13; due Saturday, Jan. 14. Must complete to proceed in course.
    • Exercise 1: Self Introduction in the Discussion Board due Sunday 

    Week 2: Jan. 16 - Jan. 22

    Anthropology Defined

    Readings

    • Erickson & Murphy:  Pps.1-61
    • Moore: ix – 3; Founders. Tyler, Morgan 5-29

    Presentation

    • Anthropology Defined

    Activities

    • Professor Meeting 2: via Adobe Connect; Wednesday, Jan. 18 from 4 pm to 5 pm, ET
    • Discussion 1: commentary due Wednesday; responses to peers due Sunday
    • Exercise 3: Ethics Statement due Sunday. Must complete to proceed in course.

    Week 3: Jan. 23 - Jan. 29

    Major Theories

    Readings

    • Erickson & Murphy: 62-110
    • Moore: Boas, Durkheim 36-54

    Presentation

    • Major Anthropological Theories

    Activities

    • Library Lessons: locating original theorist's publication and journals for essay on applying anthropology
    • Quiz 1: available Friday, Jan. 27; due Saturday, Jan. 28

    Week 4: Jan. 30 - Feb. 5

    American Cultural Patterns and Configurations

    Readings

    • Erickson & Murphy: 166-215
    • Moore: Pps. 55-58; Kroeber, Benedict 59-80, Mead 95-106

    Presentations

    • Cultural Patterns
    • Explaining and Predicting
    • Scientific Method

    Activities

    • Discussion 2: commentary due Wednesday; responses to peers due Sunday

    Week 5: Feb. 6 - Feb. 12

    British Structures and Functions

    Readings

    • Moore: Malinowksi, Radcliffe-Brown, Evans-Pritchard 122-156

    Presentations

    • Structural Functionalism
    • Units of Analysis

    Activities

    • Discussion 3: commentary due Wednesday; responses to peers due Sunday
    • Exercise 4: Course Feedback Survey due Sunday

    Week 6: Feb. 13 - Feb. 19

    Structuralism

    Readings

    • Moore: Mauss 107-121, Levi-Strauss 205-223, Douglas 247-260

    Presentations

    • Structuralism
    • Anthropological Domains of Explanation

    Activities

    • Exercise 5: Selection of one contemporary theory article, posted in Discussion Board due Sunday

    Week 7: Feb. 20 - Feb. 26

    Evolution

    Readings

    • Erickson & Murphy:  111-165
    • Moore: 157-159. White, Steward 157-184
    • Steward, Julian  (Cultural Ecology, Materialism). 1949 Cultural Causality and Law: A Trial Formulation of the Development of Early Civilizations. American Anthropologist 51(1):1-27

    Presentations

    • Evolutionism
    • Writing in the Style of the American Anthropologist

    Activities

    • Quiz 2: available Friday, Feb. 24; due Saturday, Feb. 25
    • Evolution Theory Specialist Position Statements: submit final version in Group File Exchange and corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday

    Week 8: Feb. 27 - Mar. 5

    Cognitive Theory

    Readings

    • Moore: Sapir  81-94
    • Dressler, William W., Balieiro, Mauro C., Ribeiro, Rosane P., dos Santos, José Ernesto. 2014  Culture as a Mediator of Health Disparities: Cultural Consonance, Social Class, and Health. Annals of Anthropological Practice 38(2):214-231.

    Presentations

    • Cognitive Theory

    Activities

    • Discussion/Debate 4: Evolution: commentary and responses due Sunday
    • Cognitive Theory Specialist Position Statements: submit final version in Group File Exchange and corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday
    • First Contemporary Theory Essay: due in Assignment Dropbox via Turnitin on Sunday 

    Week 9: Mar. 6 - Mar. 12

    Materialism, Political Economy

    Readings

    • Moore: Harris 185-195; Leacock 196-204; Wolf 308-326
    • Leacock, E. (Feminism, Materialism, Political Economy, Evolution). 1978  Women's Status in Egalitarian Society: Implications for Social Evolution. Current Anthropology 19:247-75

    Presentation

    • Materialism

    Activities

    • Discussion/Debate 5: Cognitive Theory: commentary and responses due Sunday
    • Materialism Theory Specialist Position Statements: submit final version in Group File Exchange and corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday

    Week 10: Mar. 13 - Mar. 19 - Spring Break. No Classes. 

    Week 11: Mar. 20 - Mar. 26

    Symbolic Interpretive

    Readings

    • Moore: Pps. 205-207; Turner 224-234; Geertz 235-246
    • Geertz, Clifford (Symbolic Interpretive). 1972 Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight. Daedalus 101(1): 1-37

    Presentation

    • Symbolic Interpretive

    Activities

    • Quiz 3: available Friday, Mar. 24; due Saturday, Mar. 25
    • Discussion/Debate 6: Materialism: commentary and responses due Sunday
    • Symbolic Interpretive Theory Specialist Position Statements: submit final version in Group File Exchange and corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday

    Week 12: Mar. 27 - Apr. 2

    Transactionalism, Processualism & Agengy

    Readings

    • Moore: Bourdieu 292-307; Sahlins 327-345
    • Claudia Strauss (Agency and Cultural Models). 2007  Blaming for Columbine: Conceptions of Agency in the Contemporary United States. Current Anthropology 48(6):807-832

    Presentation

    • Transactionalism and Agency

    Activities

    • Discussion/Debate 7: Symbolic Interpretive: commentary and responses due Sunday
    • Transactionalism/Agency Theory Specialist Position Statements: submit final version in Group File Exchange and corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday
    • Second Contemporary Theory Essay: due in Assignment Dropbox via Turnitin on Sunday

    Week 13: Apr. 3 - Apr. 9

    Biocultural, Globalization, Feminism

    Readings

    • Moore: Pps. 261-265; Fernandez  267-276; Ortner 277-291
    • Wiedman, Dennis (Biocultural, Globalization). 2012 Native American Embodiment of the Chronicities of Modernity: Reservation Food, Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome among the Kiowa, Comanche and Apache. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 26(4):595-612

    Presentations

    • Biocultural Theory
    • Feminism

    Activities

    • Discussion/Debate 8: Transactionalism/Agency: commentary and responses due Sunday
    • Biocultural Theory Specialist Position Statements: submit final version in Group File Exchange and corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday

    Week 14: Apr. 10 - Apr. 16

    Post-Modernism

    Readings

    • Moore: Postscript, Current Controversies 346-352
    • Bourdieu, Pierre (Post-Modernism – Processualism). 2004 The Peasant and His Body. Ethnography 5:579-99

    Presentations

    • Post Modernism

    Activities

    • Discussion/Debate 9: Biocultural: commentary and responses due Sunday
    • Post-ModernismTheory Specialist Position Statements: submit final version in Group File Exchange and corresponding Assignment Dropbox by Sunday
    • Contemporary Theory Presentation: due in Assignment Dropbox on Sunday
    • Extra Credit: all extra credit due Sunday (optional)

    Week 15: Apr. 17 - Apr. 23

     

    Activities

    • Discussion/Debate 10: Post-Modernism: commentary and responses due Sunday
    • Selected Contemporary Theory Presentations: professor will post them in Discussion Board for commenting

    Week 16: Apr. 24 - Apr. 29 (Saturday)

     

    Activities

    • Nominated Video Comments: in Discussion Board for commenting
    • Optional PowerPoint Presentations: posted by professor in Discussion Board for commenting
    • Final Exam: available Friday, Apr. 27 at 6 am; due Saturday, April 29 at 11:59 pm, ET.