Jackal Tanelorn

Jackal Tanelorn

Globalization, Transnational Identify, Global Hierarchy, Caribbean and Latin America

Originally from Pomona, CA, I lived in the Seattle-Tacoma area for twenty years before joining FIU’s graduate student body in 2010. I graduated summa cum laude from Pacific Lutheran University with a BA in Spanish and minors in both Norwegian and Religion. I have done research and volunteer work in both Mexico and Chile, teaching English (ELL) to both children and adults. Currently I am working as an Research Assistant to Drs. Roderick Neumann and Patricia Price in their revisions of the 12th edition of The Human Mosiac, a human geography textbook.

My doctoral research interests focus on identity and stereotypes. I emphasize the hierarchy of national citizenships across the globe and challenge the fact that national privilege does not always translate into international equality. Using a geographic lens, my research analyzes how Mexican international students perceive their global social mobility but examining their experience with the US Visa process in Mexico City. This project draws attention to the ways in which US immigration legislation presents barriers to global participation for middle class Mexicans via the literatures of mobilities and critical geographies of race. An economy of global importance, Mexico’s middle classes are actively pursuing opportunities to participate at the international level, yet on a very practical level, these opportunities often involve crossing the US – Mexico border that is seen as unequally porous in terms of desirability and directionality.

Many researchers have begun to question how the US is repelling much needed human capital through increasingly stricter visa regulations, yet few geographers explore the importance of the Mexican middle class in debates on social mobility, transnationality, and unequal access to global education. My research not only seeks to address this gap, but also seeks to explore counter-narratives of Mexican and im/migrant identities via a case study of a privileged class of Mexicans.