Joshua Mullenite

Joshua Mullenite

Joshua's research focuses on the colonial histories of flood management along the coast of the South American country of Guyana. His dissertation- tentatively titled "Engineering Colonialism: Race, Class, and the Political Economy of Water Management in British Guyana"- examines the relationship between colonial political economies of sugar and rice agriculture, processes of racialization under colonialism, and the development of a comprehensive water management system to understand how physical infrastructure is used to structure and restructure social relationships. His work also examines how colonial practices of water management shape experiences of flooding and vulnerability along the coast today with the critical focus on the social, political, and economic barriers this history places on the development of socioecological resilience. Joshua's work on this and related topics has been presented at numerous international academic conferences and has been published in Geography Compass and Consilience: The Journal of Sustainable Development.

In addition to his dissertation research, Joshua is a 2017 Gulf Research Fellow in the Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In this capacity, he works with Gulf Research Program staff and other fellows on projects related to the development of long-term community resilience in the US Gulf Coastal Region.

Josh received his BA in Anthropology summa cum laude from FIU and an AA in Anthropology with honors from Santa Fe College in 2011.